Now Reading
Government Ensures There Are Enough Drugs to Fight Cholera Outbreak

Government Ensures There Are Enough Drugs to Fight Cholera Outbreak

The Ministry of Health (MISAU) is ready to face the increase of cholera cases in several provinces and ensures the availability of drugs to deal with the disease at the peak of the rainy season that began in March and lasts until April. So far, the country has recorded 18 deaths due to cholera out of a universe of nearly two thousand cases.

Niassa, in the north, Zambezia, Sofala and Tete in the center, and Gaza in southern Mozambique are the provinces with confirmed cases of cholera. The head of the Surveillance Department at the Ministry of Health, Domingos Guihole, assures that authorities with professionals are on standby and that medicines are available.

“Our central of medicines and medical supplies has the necessary quantities of serums needed to administer to patients entering our treatment centers,” Domingos Guihole indicated, quoted by Radio France International (RFI).

For now, and according to Ramos Mboane, spokesman for the government of Niassa province, where there were 18 deaths so far recorded in the country, there is no indication of any possibility of postponement of the opening of the school year that starts on February 2.

“At the level of Niassa province, we do not have any information yet of interference in the opening of the school year with the cholera situation,” reported Ramos Mboane.

Last week, the President of the Republic, Filipe Nyusi, expressed concern over the cholera outbreak that has been registered and asked to “redouble hygiene care.”

See Also

Cholera is a treatable disease that causes severe diarrhea, but can also lead to death by dehydration if not promptly combated – largely caused by ingesting food and water contaminated by poor sanitation.

Mozambique, considered one of the countries most severely affected by climate change in the world, is in the middle of a cyclonic rainy season that occurs between the months of October and April, with winds coming from the Indian Ocean and flooding from the southern African basins.

SUBSCRIBE TO GET OUR DAILY NEWSLETTERS:

Get our daily newsletter directly in your email

close

SUBSCRIBE TO GET OUR DAILY NEWSLETTERS:

Get our daily newsletter directly in your email

Scroll To Top