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Applying For Jobs And Not Hearing Back? Here’s What To Do About It

Applying For Jobs And Not Hearing Back? Here’s What To Do About It

I love a good job hunt, but I’ll admit: it’s an arduous process.

You can spend hours scrolling through job posts and researching companies before even landing an interview with a hiring manager. Then, the real games begin. You prepare and execute. You highlight your strengths, explain your weaknesses, ask the right questions and do your best to leave a good impression.

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And most of the time, it’s all for naught. According to a 2018 survey done from the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, jobseekers with at least one interview in the last two months have only a 37% chance of receiving a job offer. Of the people that do escape the tunnel of cover letters and phone interviews with a job offer in hand, some will leave learning the salary is too low, the commute too long or the hours too rigid… And so, the process begins again.

If the job hunt isn’t a series of trials and errors, then I don’t know what is. Interviews don’t pan out, emails go unanswered, and the ego takes some punches along the way.

But I can tell you this: get through the yuckiness of it all and things can turn out great. The best job hunts take you through a few obstacles. As a career coach, I’ve just about seen them all. The good news is there are ways you can get around them.

When the position is not right for you

The job hunt takes you down a two-way street. You want to show a company that your skills match their needs, but you also want to determine whether they can meet yours. As you gather more information about what the position entails, you’ll develop a better idea of whether it fits your requirements. The sooner you determine this, the better, but sometimes you won’t know until after you’re offered an interview or, in some cases, during the interview.

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Hiring managers appreciate honesty, especially when it saves them time. If you’re certain you don’t want the position, politely decline the interview. Keep your message vague and leave room for future opportunities by thanking the company for their time and consideration. If you like the company but don’t like the role, consider asking if they have any other positions available in an area that matches your core skill set – the company might latch onto your enthusiasm and find a spot for you in a different department.

Forbes

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